Rogue Wheat Paste Installations

171118023“Old Woman” (Nov. 2017)

Trish and I started collaborating and experimenting on this series of five wheat paste installations in October of 2017. We were given an opportunity to go through and scan what ever we wanted from several boxes of old photographs that came from a house being demolished in Eureka, Nevada. This started to give us ideas for installing large scale wheat pastes of old photographs of people who lived in the community, bringing them back into old abandoned buildings they may have interacted with back in their day.

180727043“Old Woman” (Aug. 2018)

These five installations are all within the Eureka, Nevada surrounding area. “Old Woman” was the first in the series to be created. The excitement surrounding the creation of “Old Woman” fuelled us on to create even more! She is very well protected inside this old house, subsequently keeping her in pristine condition.

Amazing note: Without prior knowledge we found out that the woman in “Old Woman” actually lived in the house we placed her in!

Photographic Note: Colour differences in above photos: Top image shot with snow on the ground reflecting into building, lower image with the yellow of dried grass reflecting into the space.

 

171118026“Five Sisters” (Nov. 2017)

180727034“Five Sisters” (Aug. 2018)

The spot we picked for “Five Sisters” experienced some water damage from the non-exsitiant roof in this particular mine shack. Plus, someone pulled loose paper off, vandalizing the work. I still like how it’s aging, even though I didn’t like the fact someone tried to pull it off the wall.

180117041“Chair Baby” (Dec. 2017)

This installation takes us to another mine shack in a different location near Eureka. When I saw this room, I immediately knew the photograph I wanted to place here. We found this room this way. We do not style any of the rooms we have put our installations into, other than the wheat paste mural itself…

180117052“Chair Baby” (Dec. 2017)

180727111“Chair Baby” (Aug. 2018)

Someone smashed the chair since we last visited “Chair Baby”… Glad they didn’t vandalize the image! But, I sure loved that old chair sitting there.

180207009“Baby Watcher” (Dec. 2017)

This room intrigued me from the beginning with its slatted walls, ceiling and blank slate wall framed at one end, not to mention “Chair Baby” down the hall.

Watch a time-lapse video of Trish and I installing “Baby Watcher”. (click here)

180727038“Baby Watcher” (Aug. 2018)

180727104“Baby Watcher” (Aug. 2018)

I’m amazed at how well this installation has weathered since there is no roof to speak of on this structure.

180127026“Twins” (Dec. 2017)

An experiment on what to do with a nice corner?

180727123“Twins” (Aug. 2018)

We added more paper over the top of the door frame to the right to give this piece a more finished look. “Twins” sits in a space that offers more protection against the elements than most, making for a longer lasting wheat paste installation.

So, if you think we’re just camping out lolly gagging, you would be wrong… We’re busy coming up with the next new thing and creating all kinds of new artistic endeavours. Contact us about your upcoming projects, we’d love to collaborate! deon@deonreynolds.com

 

 

 

Advertisements

Wheat Paste Installations over Time

Trish and I have installed several large scale wheat paste murals over the past few years. I’m really impressed with their longevity and the over all quality achieved with an image created with a tiny 35mm black and white negative, printed on 20 lb. bond paper, then wheat pasted to a wall.

180507011“Roper”, our largest mural to date is 9′ high and 22′ across (April 2018). It’s located at the rear of 310 Stewart Street in Carson City, Nevada (not visible from Stewart Street). This image was created with a modified Kodak “Fun Saver Panoramic 35” disposable camera reloaded with Kodak Tri-X black & white film. The panoramic crop is created within the camera, so the negative is really quite small. Yet, I find the quality of this image to be nothing short of amazing, unless, of course you’re standing just a few feet away. At that point you’ll see the grain of the film and the wonderful flaws of a crappy plastic camera.

Watch a time-lapse of us installing “Roper” click here

161216052“Sorting” is another one of my disposable camera images, it’s 5′ x 13′. It is located in the alleyway behind the Western Folklife Center at 510 Railroad Street, Elko, Nevada. The image above was shot just after it was installed in November of 2016.

180728016Same mural in August 2018 almost two years on, it is looking a bit tattered, but it’s deteriorating in such a splendid way, I can’t help but love this wheat paste more as it ages.

With the exception of the top image “Roper”, these are true wheat paste installations, meaning we cook up flour and water with a little sugar at the end, let it cool and then roll it on the surfaces as well as over the top of the print as the only glue. For “Roper”, we used industrial grade wall paper adhesive, as Carson City was looking for a longer lasting “temporary art” installation. The Carson City mural site faces west and is blasted every afternoon by the hot Nevada sun. The Elko murals are in an alleyway protecting them from Nevada’s weather extremes.

161216032“Mustang Windmill” same camera, 5′ x 13′, was located in the alleyway behind the Carlin Trend Building in Elko, Nevada. It didn’t fare so well, as it got tagged shortly after it went up, but then, water from snow melt ran off the side of the building down the wall, mostly destroying the image all together. We removed it’s carcass after three short months.

160412_7427“Roping”, 5′ x 7′ by Trish Reynolds was created using a 1920’s Kodak Brownie camera loaded with Ilford FP-4 120 film. This was the first large scale public art installation Trish and I collaborated on (Nov. 2016).

180728010“Roping”, almost two years later, has taken on an entirely new look (August 2018).

170416079The alleyway behind the Western Folklife Center in Elko, Nevada (March 2017)

161216026“Antelope Shute” 7′ x 7′ and “Horses at Potts” 7′ x 17′ Elko, Nevada (Feb. 2017).

170221016“Horses at Potts” at 4th & Idaho in downtown Elko, Nevada. This site too, didn’t fare well, as the abandoned building doesn’t have gutters and the water (snow melt) from the roof pours off the side down the walls, making quick work of destroying the murals. Only a small amount of “Horses at Potts” is visible between political signs as of August 2018.

We love putting these murals up. It’s equally fun to install them, as it is to watch them gracefully disintegrate. Looking forward to the next installation!

 

 

 

 

Wild Camping

We’ve been houseless for over a hundred days now. The first month or so, we spent the majority of our time relaxing and enjoying the great outdoors. Relaxing was something neither one of us had an opportunity to experience for quite some time and experiencing the great outdoors is something both of us enjoy very much. Not to mention, I think the two work out quite well together.

170720015Wild camping on the crest of central Nevada’s Toiyabe Range.

During the last one hundred days we have mostly wild camped. Wild camping gets us to the places we want to create photographic images of nature. Some of the best wild camping spots are also some of the more remote spots, inviting nature to take centre stage and visited by few.

Wild camping lets us spend the night where we want to be for early and late light. Getting up really early somewhere, then driving an hour or more to get to that spot is not my idea of fun. Spending the night in a remote location surrounded by nature does.

180803132

180804204Toiyabe Crest, Nevada

Most of the wild camping we do is usually void of any kind of internet or cellular connection. It’s so nice to disconnect and pay attention to natures cycles.

180721236Monitor Valley, Nevada

We found that some county, state and national parks to be a better place to stop and use the facilities (shower/water/garbage) rather than a photographic point of interest. I’m not being derogatory towards the beauty of the parks, but moreover a reference as to how many images there are of the parks.

Below are just a few places we’ve been the last couple of months. I have been creating images on both film and digits, so it is going to be a while before we get to see what I’ve been creating on film. Unless there’s a darkroom out there, somewhere…

150608110Smith Creek Playa, Nevada

180721255Monitor Valley, Nevada

180714077Steens Mountain, Oregon

North America, Nevada, Churchill County, Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge.Stillwater Range, Nevada

120108003Diamond Playa, Nevada

170505002Lake Abert, Oregon

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada Parks

180610006Our houseless travels started out circling around North America’s Great Basin Desert. This is familiar country to us, as Trish and I have lived pretty much in the geographic centre of Nevada for the last thirteen years. All but the southernmost tip of Nevada is within the Great Basin Desert. We needed to stay close to Carson City to fulfill obligations, so, we purchased a Nevada State Park “All Access Permit” which allows the permit holder one year’s entrance, camping and boat launching at all Nevada State Park facilities. As you can imagine, we stop at Nevada State Parks frequently, even if it’s simply for a picnic or a quick shower, the permit makes everything so simple.

180506003Washoe Lake State Park is the leader of our most camped at park in Nevada, due to it’s close proximity to Reno (24 miles to the north) and Carson City (8 miles to the south). Washoe Lake is a pleasant, if not windy respite from the two cities. When we lived in Eureka, Nevada we would have business and/or a need to shop Reno and Carson about every four to six weeks. We would drive to Reno, a four and a half hour drive and accomplish the list of Reno errands, then pick up some take away and camp at Washoe Lake where we could always get a good hike in, weather permitting. The next morning after hot showers, we’d finish tasks in Carson to get on the road for our four and a half hour drive back to Eureka. Washoe Lake State Park has always been a very mellow place to spend the night, rarely ever finding but a few campers over the years. Lately, however, things have changed as we frequently find the campground full or nearly full, plus a growing community of homeless, including homeless families camping the limit. Anymore, we prefer visiting this park during the off season.

180512047On one of our journeys into the Great Basin’s “outback” we stopped at Fort Churchill State Historic Park. It had been years since we had been there and the park had always offered interesting photographic fodder. Upon arrival however we found ourselves in a mass of insects that made staying a bit uncomfortable. Before long we were packed up and driving a few miles north to Lahontan State Recreation Area. The insects may not have been any better at Lahontan, but the wind there seemed to keep them at bay. Lahontan gets busy when it’s boating season. Penis boats roaring across the reservoir at breakneck speeds and twenty-four hour drunken parties dotted along the beaches makes for an unfriendly co-exsistiance between the two kinds of wildlife that is attracted to this manmade body of water. Trish and I found Lahontan to be a delightful wildlife area with incredibly beautiful beaches to camp and hike along. Just stay away during party season!

180515025A flooded Beach #4 along Lahontan Reservoir.

180515012Lagoon at Beach #4.

180525035Walker Lake.

We decided to head east looking for less people and more landscape to explore, but didn’t want to drive US-50 (The Loneliest Road in America) since we had been driving it for so many years. So, we headed south towards Hawthorne, Nevada (Home of the world’s largest ammunition depot), then Tonopah, traversed the ET Highway and then to Caliente.

180521059Walker Lake.

Just before Hawthorne is Walker Lake, our intentions were a quick overnight camp spot, but ended up spending several days as the weather turned stormy and very interesting photographically. We had a beach front camp, few people around us and miles of beach to explore.

180308020Walker Lake.

180526001Walker Lake.

180308008Walker Lake.

Our first park on the east side of Nevada was Cathedral Gorge State Park Cathedral Gorge is near Caliente, Nevada on the eastern side of the state. We would end up back in Caliente several times over the next few weeks as we found the little market in town “Great Basin Foods” to be a well stocked grocery store with most everything one could need while camping in the area.

180601042Moon Caves.

The Juniper Draw Loop trail in Cathedral Gorge State Park is one of my favourites to hike especially at first light. The trail also connects to the Miller Point trail, another great point of interest. We spent several days here, as I like to hike with one camera, one lens, so we would hike the same trail over and over again with a different camera/lens set up.

180601052Moon Caves.

180602043Juniper Draw Loop Trail.

180602045Juniper Draw Loop Trail.

There is a cluster of Nevada State Parks around Caliente. Our intention was to stay in the area for several weeks exploring them. We want to return to a couple of the parks when we have more time, as I noticed several good photographic ideas to pursue. We ended up departing the area prematurely due to high temperatures. High elevation camping was the topic of conversation, with the air conditioner blasting, as we drove north to Great Basin National Park.

1806060013The Cirque, Great Basin National Park.

1806060022 The Cirque, Great Basin National Park.

Wheeler Peak Camp is at over 9,800 feet offering a wonderful break from the heat below. We even needed to put sweaters on in the evenings. The trails from this camp offer several amazing hiking options.

1806060063Teresa Lake, along the Alpine Lakes Loop trail in Great Basin National Park.

1806060073Stella Lake, Great Basin National Park.

After several months of van life, we still find that less is more and spending more time at locations that turn us on artistically pays off big time. As much as we like the parks, both Trish and I find “wild” camping to be the best camping of all!

 

Carson City Mural Project

You may have thought that over the past couple of months we were franticly packing up and moving out of our bank building in Eureka, Nevada. You’d be partly right! Long before we had an offer on our building, we had set into motion the creation of “Roper”, our largest mural project to date. It’s part of the National Endowment for the Arts “Big Read” program in partnership with Arts Midwest. Carson City’s event, also sponsored by Visit Carson City and the Carson City Cultural Commission titled “True Grit” offers art and literary events for everyone from May 1st through July 22nd 2018. This mural is one of the many creative interventions to reimagine vacant and blighted commercial properties in Carson City.

180507011“Roper” is located at 310 Stewart Street, Carson City, Nevada. Look to the rear of this empty building. You’re looking at the mural from the Nugget’s #6 parking lot, just two blocks from the State Capitol.

062212#1(Roping)

I created this image with a modified Kodak “Fun Saver Panoramic 35” disposable camera, re-loaded with Kodak Tri-X black and white film. “Roper” was created at a ranch that Trish and I had frequented many times. We had made an assumption that it was an abandoned ranch since we had never seen anyone there and by how run down the place was. But, on this day, we arrived to find some cowboys and cowgirls sorting and branding calves. They invited us to stay and were welcome to make photographs of them working. What a memorable day that was. Thanks to all of them!

I process all my own film and make my own prints, including this giant 9’x22′ wheat paste mural. These wheat paste images are printed on 20 lb. plotter paper using an Epson 24″ printer, taking twelve hours to print and less than two hours to install. We had help from Mark Salinas, who is Carson City’s Arts & Culture Coordinator. Click the link for a 29 second time-lapse video of the installation.   “Roper” Time-Lapse 

180507058With one of my many Kodak “Fun Saver Panoramic 35” disposable cameras.

180507045I love how the concrete blocks show through the image in this detail.

IMG_9140One of the RV campers made this sign from a pizza box to make sure no one parked in the way of our installation…

IMG_9147The day prior to installation Trish and I showed up at the site to prep the wall. We brushed off the loose paint, rolled on TSP and sprayed it off with clean water.

IMG_9160

 

 

 

“Harnessing the Wind” Construction

The construction portfolio of “Harnessing the Wind” consists of 21 – 6 1/2” x 10” color digital photographs, printed on 8 1/2” x 11” Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Bright White 301 gsm smooth paper on an Epson 7890 printer using Epson’s Ultrachrome K3 inkset. I made five behind the scenes visits to document the construction of two utility grade commercial wind energy projects in the United States. The photographs were created between 2012 and 2014, printed by myself in Eureka, Nevada in November of 2015.

22_101311220

A large hole is excavated for the base of the wind turbine. Since this wind farm was built on Bureau of Land Management land, BLM archeologist contractors oversee the excavation watching for archeological artifacts. The painted diagram on the first layer of concrete is a template for the rebar. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

23_101311043

Rebar is put into place. A crane moves the rebar for the workers to assemble. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

24_101311329

Once the rebar is put into place, workers build the concrete forms. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

25_101311003

Workers pour concrete over the rebar contained by the forms. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

26_101311297

Ground wires are placed over the finished concrete base. It is now ready for backfilling with earth. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

27_042712034

Once the backfilling is complete, cranes built on site erect the tower. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

28_140618483

A painter prepares the surface on a tower section prior to assembly. Pattern Energy’s Panhandle 2 Wind, Texas.

29_140619229

Tower sections are assembled by site built cranes. Pattern Energy’s Panhandle 2 Wind, Texas.

30_042712416

A nacelle is lifted off the truck trailer and prepped for lift. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

31_042712075

A worker atop the tower awaits the arrival of the nacelle. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

32_042712325

Two workers place a lift strap around a blade in preparation for assembly to the hub. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

33_042712300

The blade is lifted by crane for assembly to the hub. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

35_042712308

Workers maneuver the blade for proper alignment to the hub. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

36_042712117

Workers hook up the blade assembly to the crane. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

37_140618459

A site built crane begins to lift the blade and hub assembly to the nacelle. Pattern Energy’s Panhandle 2 Wind, Texas.

38_042712173

Hub and blade assembly lift. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

39_042712186

The crane positions the blade and hub assembly for attachment to the nacelle. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

40_140619535

A worker attaches the blade and hub assembly. Pattern Energy’s Panhandle 2 Wind, Texas.

41_042712512

An electrical substation is built on site to connect to the power grid. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

42_130620016

Power transmission lines carry power from the wind farm to the electrical grid. Pattern Energy’s Ocotillo Wind, California.

Here is a link to the “Harnessing the Wind” portfolio.

Special thanks to NV Energy, Pattern Energy and Mortenson Construction for their generous contributions that helped to make this portfolio possible!

Untitled-1

 

“Harnessing the Wind”

I am beyond thrilled to be a part of the Archive Collections of the Center for Art + Environment at the Nevada Museum of Art!

01_080812432Spring Valley, Nevada

My portfolio “Harnessing the Wind” consists of 21 – 14” x 21” color digital photographs, printed on 17” x 22” Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Bright White 301 gsm smooth paper on an Epson 7890 printer using Epson’s Ultrachrome K3 inkset. I made 15 in depth visits to three utility grade commercial wind energy projects in the United States. The photographs were created between 2012 and 2014, printed by myself in Eureka, Nevada in November of 2015.

02_080812436Spring Valley, Nevada

I was contacted by a San Francisco advertising agency in 2011 to document construction of Nevada’s first utility grade wind farm, and was excited to work on an assignment incorporating a gorgeous landscape with an industrial scale renewable energy project.

03_080812591Spring Valley, Nevada

Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind is situated on 7,680 acres of BLM administered land, thirty miles east of Ely, Nevada in White Pine County near US-50. Spring Valley Wind consists of 66 2.3 megawatt Siemens wind turbine generators. The 152 megawatt facility started selling electricity to NV Energy in August of 2012.

12/17/2012 Spring Valley Wind ParkSpring Valley, Nevada

After negotiations, planning meetings and scheduling, I finally had the opportunity to explore the Spring Valley construction site in October of 2011. I located the lay down yard covered with pick up trucks, heavy equipment and temporary office trailers and checked in with the staff of Mortenson Construction. Site specific safety training and personal safety equipment are a prerequisite prior to entering the construction site. We were escorted by a safety officer for a tour of the site while working out the best way to accomplish an extensive shot list.

121912 Spring Valley Wind ParkSpring Valley, Nevada

We scouted locations the day before for early light and arrived the next day about an hour before sunrise. Provided we followed strict safety rules, stay out of active construction zones and wore our safety gear, we were free to roam the site making photographs of the largely unfinished wind farm. Shortly after sunrise, crews began arriving for their daily safety briefing. We met our safety officer, who escorted us to the individual construction sites. He introduced us to each site’s foreman, who in turn would go over site specific safety concerns and then had us sign in.

121912 Spring Valley Wind ParkSpring Valley, Nevada

My wife, Trish, who is also my producer and assistant, would set me up with equipment for the particular scene. Sometimes, she would need to stay back while I went into the active construction site with the safety officer watching my back enabling me to get close to the action without getting hurt or impeding construction. At sites that were less hectic or dangerous, she’d assist by holding a radio controlled strobe or fill card to help with lighting.

121912 Spring Valley Wind ParkSpring Valley, Nevada

Because Spring Valley is located on BLM public lands, excavation was done with archeologists observing for artifacts. The BLM also required the areas around the turbines to be restored to its natural state upon completion to have as little impact as possible on the fragile desert ecosystem. At this early point in construction, other than the grid of access roads, most of the landscape was undisturbed. I documented workers using heavy equipment excavating, setting rebar and then pouring concrete foundations. After those tasks, more earthwork was done to back fill the foundations.

08_130619090Ocotillo, California

We returned to Spring Valley in April of 2012 to photograph a much more evolved construction site. Although far from it, the site looked largely complete. This time, we photographed tower erections and 174’ blades being connected to the hub. The lift involves picking up a complete rotor assembly, lifting it to the top of the 262’ tower with a giant site-built crane while workers inside connect the two pieces.

09_130619134Ocotillo, California

Returning in August 2012 we photographed the grand opening for Pattern Energy which was preempted by stormy weather. It was spectacular weather for me though, so I was busy until it was too dark to shoot creating many of the images found in this portfolio.

10_130619229Ocotillo, California

Our last photo shoot at Spring Valley Wind was to document the entire wind farm in the winter. The snow finally flew in December and we spent a couple of beautiful, but very cold, (-18˚C / 0˚F) days photographing.

11_130620309Ocotillo, California

The success at Spring Valley Wind led to an invitation to photograph Pattern Energy’s Ocotillo Wind facility located on 12,500 acres of BLM land, northwest of Ocotillo, California in Imperial County. This site consists of 112 – 2.3 megawatt Siemens turbines. The 265 megawatt facility started selling electricity in July of 2013.

12_130621036Ocotillo, California

On our first trip to Ocotillo, we arrived at the mostly completed wind farm in mid June. Ocotillo is just 12 miles from the US Mexico border and it was very hot. For our three-day photo shoot the lowest temperate was 28˚C (83˚F) and the high was 46˚C (114˚F).

13_130621200Ocotillo, California

This photo shoot was very different from Spring Valley. My shot list was primarily to create beautiful landscape images of the facility and to make it look like it was functioning when it was not.

14_131121088Ocotillo, California

I was also charged with documenting this facility’s unique feature, the “Bird Tower”, an observation tower staffed by an ornithologist to watch for avian activity. The ornithologist has the ability to shut down the entire facility to reduce bird mortality. The facility was also stocked with equipment to respond to any wild animal event. I spent three days photographing Ocotillo Wind. We returned one last time to document the grand opening event and to photograph the fully functioning power generating facility.

15_140617185Panhandle, Texas

The next invitation from Pattern was to the Panhandle of Texas for a three day photo shoot in June of 2014.

16_140617301Panhandle, Texas

Panhandle Wind is divided into two wind farms with both facilities located north of Panhandle, Texas in Carson County. Pan 1 is located on 52 privately held parcels of land with long-term lease agreements consisting of 118 – 1.85 megawatt General Electric turbines generating 218 megawatts. It began commercial operation in July of 2014. Pan 2 is located immediately west of Pan 1 on 40 privately held parcels of land with long-term lease agreements consisting of 79 – 2.3 megawatt Siemens turbines generating 182 megawatts. It started commercial operation in November of 2014.

17_140617414Panhandle, Texas

The Panhandle of Texas is so flat you can make out the curvature of the earth. I thought the location was going to be a challenge since all the other wind farms I’d previously documented were surrounded by dramatic geologic formations. Turns out, the flat landscape didn’t make the location any less interesting to photograph.

18_141114206Panhandle, Texas

Pan 1 was finished and producing power and Pan 2 was well into its construction phase. I was charged with a long shot list of specific construction images to be completed plus a few landscape shots of Pan 1 since it was finished, and any images I could get of Pan 2 that made it look like it was up and running.

19_141114239Panhandle, Texas

We returned to Panhandle, Texas in November of 2014 for a one-day photo shoot to document the grand opening event and create beauty images of the now fully functioning Pan 2. For several weeks prior to the grand opening the weather had been dull, gray and raining and it wasn’t looking promising for photographing anything outside.

20_141114297Panhandle, Texas

We had luck on our side though. Other than it was 10 degrees and windy, we had blue sky and sun. The turbines looked fantastic and were operating at peak capacity. I came prepared for any weather and donned my arctic parka and took to the wind farm once again to document it from before sun up to after sun down.

21_141114709Panhandle, Texas

Here is a link to the “Construction” portfolio.

Special thanks to NV Energy, Pattern Energy and Mortenson Construction for their generous contributions that helped to make this portfolio possible!

Untitled-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

9th Annual RayKo Plastic Camera Show

I’m very pleased to announce two of my images from Burning Man have juried into the RayKo Photo Center’s 9th Annual International Juried Plastic Camera Show. Thanks Ann!

090215#12

“Temple”

090115#8

“Hat Trick”

I am frequently asked, “What is a plastic camera”? Simply put, it is a camera made of plastic or more specifically a lens made of plastic. In other words, low quality, crappy optics. For me using a plastic camera translates into freedom from the technological aspects of photography allowing me to concentrate on the graphics and design of an image.

These photographs were created using a Kodak “Fun Saver Panoramic” disposable camera that I reload with Kodak Tri-X black & white film. Like most artists I’m a control freak when it comes to my art. I process my own film and do all my own printing, both optical and digital. I make my own scans and print these images digitally on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper using an Epson 7890 printer with K3 ink set for an archival quality print that will last for generations.

The Opening Artists Reception is Wednesday, March 9th from 6-8pm.

The exhibition runs from March 9th through April 29th, 2016

The Opening is free and open to the public. Many of the artists will be at the artists’ reception. Please support the arts by attending arts events and buying art. Hope to see you there!

RayKo Photo Center

428 Third Street

San Francisco, CA 94107
415-495-3773

 

Burning Man 2015

Burning Man 2015

Burning Man has never really appealed to me. Maybe because I become uneasy at the thought of large crowds, let alone a really large crowd in a place that Trish and I have been camping in for decades. Camping without a crowd, or without seeing … Continue reading

My Darkroom

Darkroom#1

This was my darkroom in our house back in Warren, Oregon. The room was an addition to the rear of our 1895 farm house on an acre of land just a half an hour from downtown Portland. The 12 x 24 x 9 foot room mirrored a 12 x 24 x 9 finishing room accessible via a 36 inch revolving darkroom door allowing access even when in use. The finishing room is where I had computers, printers and scanners along with flat files and framing equipment, to complete any kind of printing project. The darkroom had room to adapt to many kinds of darkroom needs. Above the 16 feet of stainless steel sink note the plastic perforated pipe, a plastic fan sucked the air off the sink removing the chemical odors very efficiently. Two wall mounted “Omega” D5 XL’s, one fitted with an “Arista” Cold Light Head, the other an Omega color head. A “Thomas” sodium vapor safe light makes working in the room as bright as day.

Darkroom#2

I miss this room very much! The need for a darkroom and larger studio/shop space has been a major factor for our need to move. We will miss our 1880 bank building complete with walk-In vault, but we need a lot more square feet to work in. We have had our building here in Eureka, Nevada “For Sale”for over three years now. I must admit I’m growing impatient… My current darkroom is a half bath off the studio, at least it has the space to develop film. I still have all of the darkroom equipment, but no room to set it up in. I am very much ready to start making silver prints again, not to mention Platinum/Palladium prints. Where will my new darkroom be? Where should our next move take us?