Artists and Art Organizations

Sorry Nevada, it seems your time has come and gone. This makes us very sad, as we both fell in love with your amazing and inspirational landscape.

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Trish and I are full time artists, which means we need to make ends meet though our art. We did indeed make ends meet when we first arrived in Nevada thirteen years ago, but the last few years haven’t worked out so well. We have noted that many of our artist friends are also experiencing similar issues. I think it has a lot to do with the state of this nation, but that’s another story. Neither one of us have a trust fund and obviously we’re not married to someone wealthy who can pay for our art supplies and monthly bills.

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From our perspective, many of Nevada’s art organizations can barely support themselves and most do so on the backs of artists, the ones they should be supporting. We are always thrilled to hang a show, however these organizations put the financial responsibility on the artist for delivery of a gallery ready show. Do you have any idea what that costs? Not to mention how much we already have into our works (Education, time, materials, transportation, etc)? Think about it, it’s not cheap! Why do you always want something for free? Most of these galleries/organizations don’t actively work for the artist to make sales, it’s just entertainment for the public and putting their space in the limelight. Many of these galleries often have hours that are not conducive for folks to visit or are simply closed when they say they’re supposed to be open. We have had so many complaints from folks because they were unable to visit one of our exhibits. Exposure is always a good thing, but if they have weird hours, or a location that is difficult to find, what good is that? Artists need to make a living and sales are beneficial to both the artist and the hosting gallery. Years ago, most real galleries and arts organizations would compensate artists for hanging a show. This would help, as now days it’s always money out of our pockets, not theirs. We make these galleries/organizations look amazing, at our expense. The least they could do is work for us, too.

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Many Nevada non profits ask us to make art donations, and we have gladly fulfilled their requests many times. While we both received lots of thank you’s, donations have never lead to a sale. It seems to only bring in more requests for art donations. Making an art donation takes time and money to create, frame and deliver. While we like supporting the organizations, our accountant scolds us for doing so. There’s something truly wrong with this lop sided picture…

Apologies for the rant, but folks need to understand that art takes time and money to create.

Please feel free to make comments, we would love to hear from you!

e-mail

www.deonreynolds.com

www.trishreynolds.com

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

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13 Years in Eureka, Nevada

I grew up in Portland, Oregon, Trish grew up across the Columbia River in Vancouver, Washington. We met in a camera store in Portland, imagine that! This part of the Pacific Northwest is what we call the wet side of the Cascades. In other words, it’s usually grey and drizzly if not down right raining most of the time. The rain is something we ultimately dread despite our excitement of going back to the Northwest to visit friends and family.

051298a#3(7thStreet)“7th Street” (1998)

“7th Street” is located just outside of Eureka in Diamond Valley. I created this image in May of 1998 when Trish and I were exploring the state creating images for a “NEVADA” calendar long before we ever considered moving to Eureka.

WARNING: sunshine is habit forming!

030609#11(DiamondMountains)“Diamond Mountain Sky” (2011)

For nearly a decade we had been creating images for “NEVADA” calendars and eventually our “NEVADA” book, both published by Graphic Arts Center. This was before we made the move to Eureka in 2005. So, we were already very much accustomed to the sunshine, low humidity and the high elevation of the Great Basin Desert. It wasn’t long before we learned the shoulder seasons were the best for our outback adventures that were just outside our door living in Eureka.

001“General Store” (2009)

Moving from the damp and rainy climate of the Pacific Northwest to a completely new landscape in a completely new climate zone was nothing short of exciting! Eureka is a small community (pop. 500ish) and at 1,975 metres, it’s high in the mountains of North America’s Great Basin Desert. Eureka gets about 22 centimetres of precipitation a year that mostly falls as snow. Eureka, also enjoys 300 days of sunshine and due to the high elevation it usually doesn’t get too hot during the summer. We found the artistic possibilities to be endless in every direction. The flip side however, it’s a very long drive before you find a real grocery store.

009“Eureka Angel” (2005)

123109c#33(NEVADA)“Snow On It” (2009)

111417#14(TwoHeadStones)“Two Headstones” (2011)

123109d#11(EurekaAngel)“Sky Angel” (2009)

Eureka has several very photogenic historic cemeteries, a frequent stop during our daily walks.

111417#16“Main Street Cowboy” (2017)

023“Walt’s Western Art” (2017)

070416c#8“Alpine Hotel” (2016)

111109#7“No Trespassing” (2009)

013“Hardware Store” (2017)

Eureka is filled with historic buildings in various stages of decay, or if the property is lucky, restoration. Trish and I walk regularly and most of the time I would pick a camera that inspires me that day and take it along on the excursion.

040313c#1(EndOfTheRoad)“End of the Road” (2013)

010210b#9“Mobile Living” (2010)

007“Little Trailer” (2010)

Eureka’s mobile living is not quite as old or as historic as other buildings in town. However, mobile living is part of a miner’s life, whether they are hauling their tree limbs from camp to camp, or moving their 5th wheel to the next big thing. I find these homes to be very interesting photographic fodder.

052013c#5“No Outlet” (2013)

Living in Eureka was an interesting experience to say the least. We were consistently amazed at an ever changing landscape, providing ceaseless inspiration for our art work. Plus, the wildlife we encountered while in Eureka was nothing short of amazing (I’m not a wildlife photographer, so don’t expect that). Our photographic library in both analog and digital grew exponentially, a tribute to the fabulous space known as the Great Basin Desert. And yes, we have images available for license.

So, why leave, you might ask? Several factors forced our move. Economics and death threats lead the list. Nevada Tourism changed how they promote Hwy 50, “The Loneliest Road in America” and at the same time, the Eureka County Commission cut funding for tourism and economic development. This double whammy effectively stopped tourists from visiting Eureka ending our seven year run of the Eureka Gallery. Next up, quite a few locals made our lives miserable. The so called art collector that encouraged our move to Eureka in the first place, turned out to be a sociopathic narcissist (run don’t walk away from these people). Plus, the last couple of years we received numerous death threats from newly empowered, uneducated, racist gun nuts. The last year we lived in Eureka we mostly hid out of fear, going out at odd times for errands and exercise. Just flat out being gone was our best option. Clearly we didn’t fit in Eureka, time to move on…

Photographic note: All of the images on this post were created on film with either a Kodak disposable, Holga or Hasselblad camera.

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

 

 

 

 

 

Rogue Wheat Paste Installations

171118023“Old Woman” (Nov. 2017)

Trish and I started collaborating and experimenting on this series of five wheat paste installations in October of 2017. We were given an opportunity to go through and scan what ever we wanted from several boxes of old photographs that came from a house being demolished in Eureka, Nevada. This started to give us ideas for installing large scale wheat pastes of old photographs of people who lived in the community, bringing them back into old abandoned buildings they may have interacted with back in their day.

180727043“Old Woman” (Aug. 2018)

These five installations are all within the Eureka, Nevada surrounding area. “Old Woman” was the first in the series to be created. The excitement surrounding the creation of “Old Woman” fuelled us on to create even more! She is very well protected inside this old house, subsequently keeping her in pristine condition.

Amazing note: Without prior knowledge we found out that the woman in “Old Woman” actually lived in the house we placed her in!

Photographic Note: Colour differences in above photos: Top image shot with snow on the ground reflecting into building, lower image with the yellow of dried grass reflecting into the space.

 

171118026“Five Sisters” (Nov. 2017)

180727034“Five Sisters” (Aug. 2018)

The spot we picked for “Five Sisters” experienced some water damage from the non-exsitiant roof in this particular mine shack. Plus, someone pulled loose paper off, vandalizing the work. I still like how it’s aging, even though I didn’t like the fact someone tried to pull it off the wall.

180117041“Chair Baby” (Dec. 2017)

This installation takes us to another mine shack in a different location near Eureka. When I saw this room, I immediately knew the photograph I wanted to place here. We found this room this way. We do not style any of the rooms we have put our installations into, other than the wheat paste mural itself…

180117052“Chair Baby” (Dec. 2017)

180727111“Chair Baby” (Aug. 2018)

Someone smashed the chair since we last visited “Chair Baby”… Glad they didn’t vandalize the image! But, I sure loved that old chair sitting there.

180207009“Baby Watcher” (Dec. 2017)

This room intrigued me from the beginning with its slatted walls, ceiling and blank slate wall framed at one end, not to mention “Chair Baby” down the hall.

Watch a time-lapse video of Trish and I installing “Baby Watcher”. (click here)

180727038“Baby Watcher” (Aug. 2018)

180727104“Baby Watcher” (Aug. 2018)

I’m amazed at how well this installation has weathered since there is no roof to speak of on this structure.

180127026“Twins” (Dec. 2017)

An experiment on what to do with a nice corner?

180727123“Twins” (Aug. 2018)

We added more paper over the top of the door frame to the right to give this piece a more finished look. “Twins” sits in a space that offers more protection against the elements than most, making for a longer lasting wheat paste installation.

So, if you think we’re just camping out lolly gagging, you would be wrong… We’re busy coming up with the next new thing and creating all kinds of new artistic endeavours. Contact us about your upcoming projects, we’d love to collaborate! e-mail me

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

 

 

 

Wheat Paste Installations over Time

Trish and I have installed several large scale wheat paste murals over the past few years. I’m really impressed with their longevity and the over all quality achieved with an image created with a tiny 35mm black and white negative, printed on 20 lb. bond paper, then wheat pasted to a wall.

180507011“Roper”, our largest mural to date is 9′ high and 22′ across (April 2018). It’s located at the rear of 310 Stewart Street in Carson City, Nevada (not visible from Stewart Street). This image was created with a modified Kodak “Fun Saver Panoramic 35” disposable camera reloaded with Kodak Tri-X black & white film. The panoramic crop is created within the camera, so the negative is really quite small. Yet, I find the quality of this image to be nothing short of amazing, unless, of course you’re standing just a few feet away. At that point you’ll see the grain of the film and the wonderful flaws of a crappy plastic camera.

Watch a time-lapse of us installing “Roper” click here

161216052“Sorting” is another one of my disposable camera images, it’s 5′ x 13′. It is located in the alleyway behind the Western Folklife Center at 510 Railroad Street, Elko, Nevada. The image above was shot just after it was installed in November of 2016.

180728016Same mural in August 2018 almost two years on, it is looking a bit tattered, but it’s deteriorating in such a splendid way, I can’t help but love this wheat paste more as it ages.

With the exception of the top image “Roper”, these are true wheat paste installations, meaning we cook up flour and water with a little sugar at the end, let it cool and then roll it on the surfaces as well as over the top of the print as the only glue. For “Roper”, we used industrial grade wall paper adhesive, as Carson City was looking for a longer lasting “temporary art” installation. The Carson City mural site faces west and is blasted every afternoon by the hot Nevada sun. The Elko murals are in an alleyway protecting them from Nevada’s weather extremes.

161216032“Mustang Windmill” same camera, 5′ x 13′, was located in the alleyway behind the Carlin Trend Building in Elko, Nevada. It didn’t fare so well, as it got tagged shortly after it went up, but then, water from snow melt ran off the side of the building down the wall, mostly destroying the image all together. We removed it’s carcass after three short months.

160412_7427“Roping”, 5′ x 7′ by Trish Reynolds was created using a 1920’s Kodak Brownie camera loaded with Ilford FP-4 120 film. This was the first large scale public art installation Trish and I collaborated on (Nov. 2016).

180728010“Roping”, almost two years later, has taken on an entirely new look (August 2018).

170416079The alleyway behind the Western Folklife Center in Elko, Nevada (March 2017)

161216026“Antelope Shute” 7′ x 7′ and “Horses at Potts” 7′ x 17′ Elko, Nevada (Feb. 2017).

170221016“Horses at Potts” at 4th & Idaho in downtown Elko, Nevada. This site too, didn’t fare well, as the abandoned building doesn’t have gutters and the water (snow melt) from the roof pours off the side down the walls, making quick work of destroying the murals. Only a small amount of “Horses at Potts” is visible between political signs as of August 2018.

We love putting these murals up. It’s equally fun to install them, as it is to watch them gracefully disintegrate. Looking forward to the next installation!

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

 

 

 

2015 Somerville Toy Camera Festival

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I’m excited that my image “Ibex Dunes” juried into the 2015 Somerville Toy Camera Festival, in Somerville, Massachusetts, Juried by Aline Smithson creator of the Lenscratch Blog.

Ibex Dunes was slated to be exhibited at the Nave Gallery, but due to logistical issues was moved to the Nave Gallery Annex at the last minute.

The Nave Gallery Annex is located at:

53 Chester St, Somerville, MA (Davis Square)

Opening Reception is Thursday September 10th 6:00 – 8:00 PM

The exhibition runs from September 10th – 27th 2015

Ibex Dunes is located in Death Valley National Park and was created with a modified Kodak “Fun Saver Panoramic 35” disposable camera reloaded with Kodak Tri-X film.

More information on my photographic art can be found at my website www.deonreynolds.com

Capital City Arts Initiative Show

I have a show, “Tow’ring High” at the Capital City Arts Initiative in Carson City, Nevada.

July 8th  –  November 15th , 2015

Carson City Community Center’s Sierra Room
851 E. William Street, Carson City, Nevada
Open to the public during City meetings, most M – Th evenings

Every image in this show was created with a modified Kodak “Fun Saver Panoramic 35” disposable camera reloaded with Kodak Tri-X 35mm film. I process the film in my own darkroom, scan the negatives and print digital archival prints on Hahnemühle Fine Art Pearl paper with an Epson 7890 wide format printer. Trish and I cut, assemble and paint all our own frame moulding, plus we cut the glass and mattes then assemble. In other words we create absolutely everything, down to the very last detail!

Here is the show, better yet, go see it yourself, they look so much better in person.

And, they would look even better on your wall! Support the arts, buy art!

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“Cow Camp Fence”

02_041613#25(KeepRight)

“Keep Right”

03_071212#27(RubyHillSky)

“Ruby Hill Sky”

04_032313#16(BUMP)

“BUMP”

05_041910a#26(NewarkRanch)

“Newark Ranch”

06_032213#14(Nothing)

“Nothing”

07_042109#13(SteensMountain)

“Steens Mountain”

08_050898a#26(WardCharcoalOvens)

“Ward Charcoal Ovens”

09_051298a#3(7thStreet)

“7th Street”

10_051610#21(HuntingtonFence)

“Huntington Fence”

11_062610b#26(DiamondWindmill)

“Diamond Windmill”

12_052509a#20(WHOA!)

“WHOA”

13_122104#30(HamiltonCorral)

“Hamilton Corral”

14_101313#00(MustangWindmill)

“Mustang Windmill”

15_102998#21(25MPR_II)

“25MPR II”

Month of Photography in Los Angeles

April is the Month of Photography across the globe and FATHOM in Los Angeles, California is celebrating with a truly unique exhibition. Every morning through the month of April FATHOM will hang a new solo photography show. Each photographer will have their own dedicated gallery opening reception from 4PM to 8PM or noon to 5PM on Sundays. All of the photographers’ work, in the 30 Days and 30 Nights Exhibition, will be available for viewing throughout the month. This exhibition format is designed to combine the benefits of a group show with the focus of a solo show for each photographer. The exhibition gives photography collectors an opportunity to consider hundreds of images from 30 unique photographers — in one place for an entire month. Normally, this level of access would only be found at a photography festival lasting only a few frenetic days. The goal of this exhibition is to showcase all facets of photography from fine art through commercial, and photojournalism… and photographers from all career stages; the completely undiscovered through museum masters. It’s Fathom’s first show in their new downtown Los Angeles gallery and they are pulling out all the stops to make it something memorable.

Here are the eleven images selected by FATHOM to be part of this incredible show.  These photographs were created with a Kodak Fun Saver Panoramic 35 disposable camera reloaded with Kodak Tri-X film.

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“Surveillance” (17×7) Ruby Hill Road, Eureka, Nevada.

031713b#7

“No Deliveries” (17×7) Silver Peak Road, Silver Peak, Nevada.

032213#14

“nothing” (32×13) US-95, Nothing, Arizona.

032313#16

“BUMP” (32×13) Wiley Road, Gold Point, Nevada.

042597b#15

“No Tools” (17×7) Doobie Lane, Black Rock, Nevada.

051298a#3

“7th Street” (32×13) NV-278, Eureka, Nevada.

052509a#20

“WHOA” (32×13) NV-487, Baker, Nevada.

080705#11

“Slow” (17×7) NV-582, Henderson, Nevada.

101609#4

“Blackfeet” (17×7) Duck Lake Road, Browning, Montana.

102498B#32

“Rye Patch” (17×7) I-80, Imlay, Nevada.

122494#7

“Deep Sand” (17×7) Ibex Dunes Road, Death Valley National Park, California.