Day Trips Around Eureka

120316053The Geographic Center of Nevada is located not far from Eureka, Nevada.

For 13 years we’ve taken regular day trips around Eureka, shooting both film and digital images depending on our mood of the day and subject matter. This is what we will miss the most about living in the centre of Nevada. Sometimes during the Spring and Fall (our peak), we would take day trips every week. Winter and Summer are great times to be out too, but winter snows and muddy roads frequently makes back country travel difficult, not to mention dangerous. During the summer months it can get down right hot in the valleys, making it so you don’t want to get out of your air conditioned vehicle. The area around Eureka has an extremely low population density. What this meant for us is fantastic photographic opportunities, unencumbered by people getting in the way.

Please enjoy a photographic journey around the centre of the Great Basin Desert!

131108016Monitor Valley

040313c#6Kobeh Valley

150608110Smith Creek Playa

060815#30(SmithCreekValley)Smith Creek Playa

NV-2307Austin

101313#00(MustangWindmill)Diamond Valley

131013004Diamond Playa

052513#11Black Rock Desert

130714113Jumbled Rock Gulch

032313#16(BUMP)Lida Valley

NV-****Lahontan Valley

120330083Lunar Crater

111129082Potts Ranch

NV-1932*Buena Vista Valley

151013009Schell Creek Range

130106043Newark Valley

Thank you for taking the time to check out our adventures!

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

 

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13 Years in Eureka, Nevada

I grew up in Portland, Oregon, Trish grew up across the Columbia River in Vancouver, Washington. We met in a camera store in Portland, imagine that! This part of the Pacific Northwest is what we call the wet side of the Cascades. In other words, it’s usually grey and drizzly if not down right raining most of the time. The rain is something we ultimately dread despite our excitement of going back to the Northwest to visit friends and family.

051298a#3(7thStreet)“7th Street” (1998)

“7th Street” is located just outside of Eureka in Diamond Valley. I created this image in May of 1998 when Trish and I were exploring the state creating images for a “NEVADA” calendar long before we ever considered moving to Eureka.

WARNING: sunshine is habit forming!

030609#11(DiamondMountains)“Diamond Mountain Sky” (2011)

For nearly a decade we had been creating images for “NEVADA” calendars and eventually our “NEVADA” book, both published by Graphic Arts Center. This was before we made the move to Eureka in 2005. So, we were already very much accustomed to the sunshine, low humidity and the high elevation of the Great Basin Desert. It wasn’t long before we learned the shoulder seasons were the best for our outback adventures that were just outside our door living in Eureka.

001“General Store” (2009)

Moving from the damp and rainy climate of the Pacific Northwest to a completely new landscape in a completely new climate zone was nothing short of exciting! Eureka is a small community (pop. 500ish) and at 1,975 metres, it’s high in the mountains of North America’s Great Basin Desert. Eureka gets about 22 centimetres of precipitation a year that mostly falls as snow. Eureka, also enjoys 300 days of sunshine and due to the high elevation it usually doesn’t get too hot during the summer. We found the artistic possibilities to be endless in every direction. The flip side however, it’s a very long drive before you find a real grocery store.

009“Eureka Angel” (2005)

123109c#33(NEVADA)“Snow On It” (2009)

111417#14(TwoHeadStones)“Two Headstones” (2011)

123109d#11(EurekaAngel)“Sky Angel” (2009)

Eureka has several very photogenic historic cemeteries, a frequent stop during our daily walks.

111417#16“Main Street Cowboy” (2017)

023“Walt’s Western Art” (2017)

070416c#8“Alpine Hotel” (2016)

111109#7“No Trespassing” (2009)

013“Hardware Store” (2017)

Eureka is filled with historic buildings in various stages of decay, or if the property is lucky, restoration. Trish and I walk regularly and most of the time I would pick a camera that inspires me that day and take it along on the excursion.

040313c#1(EndOfTheRoad)“End of the Road” (2013)

010210b#9“Mobile Living” (2010)

007“Little Trailer” (2010)

Eureka’s mobile living is not quite as old or as historic as other buildings in town. However, mobile living is part of a miner’s life, whether they are hauling their tree limbs from camp to camp, or moving their 5th wheel to the next big thing. I find these homes to be very interesting photographic fodder.

052013c#5“No Outlet” (2013)

Living in Eureka was an interesting experience to say the least. We were consistently amazed at an ever changing landscape, providing ceaseless inspiration for our art work. Plus, the wildlife we encountered while in Eureka was nothing short of amazing (I’m not a wildlife photographer, so don’t expect that). Our photographic library in both analog and digital grew exponentially, a tribute to the fabulous space known as the Great Basin Desert. And yes, we have images available for license.

So, why leave, you might ask? Several factors forced our move. Economics and death threats lead the list. Nevada Tourism changed how they promote Hwy 50, “The Loneliest Road in America” and at the same time, the Eureka County Commission cut funding for tourism and economic development. This double whammy effectively stopped tourists from visiting Eureka ending our seven year run of the Eureka Gallery. Next up, quite a few locals made our lives miserable. The so called art collector that encouraged our move to Eureka in the first place, turned out to be a sociopathic narcissist (run don’t walk away from these people). Plus, the last couple of years we received numerous death threats from newly empowered, uneducated, racist gun nuts. The last year we lived in Eureka we mostly hid out of fear, going out at odd times for errands and exercise. Just flat out being gone was our best option. Clearly we didn’t fit in Eureka, time to move on…

Photographic note: All of the images on this post were created on film with either a Kodak disposable, Holga or Hasselblad camera.

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

 

 

 

 

 

Rogue Wheat Paste Installations

171118023“Old Woman” (Nov. 2017)

Trish and I started collaborating and experimenting on this series of five wheat paste installations in October of 2017. We were given an opportunity to go through and scan what ever we wanted from several boxes of old photographs that came from a house being demolished in Eureka, Nevada. This started to give us ideas for installing large scale wheat pastes of old photographs of people who lived in the community, bringing them back into old abandoned buildings they may have interacted with back in their day.

180727043“Old Woman” (Aug. 2018)

These five installations are all within the Eureka, Nevada surrounding area. “Old Woman” was the first in the series to be created. The excitement surrounding the creation of “Old Woman” fuelled us on to create even more! She is very well protected inside this old house, subsequently keeping her in pristine condition.

Amazing note: Without prior knowledge we found out that the woman in “Old Woman” actually lived in the house we placed her in!

Photographic Note: Colour differences in above photos: Top image shot with snow on the ground reflecting into building, lower image with the yellow of dried grass reflecting into the space.

 

171118026“Five Sisters” (Nov. 2017)

180727034“Five Sisters” (Aug. 2018)

The spot we picked for “Five Sisters” experienced some water damage from the non-exsitiant roof in this particular mine shack. Plus, someone pulled loose paper off, vandalizing the work. I still like how it’s aging, even though I didn’t like the fact someone tried to pull it off the wall.

180117041“Chair Baby” (Dec. 2017)

This installation takes us to another mine shack in a different location near Eureka. When I saw this room, I immediately knew the photograph I wanted to place here. We found this room this way. We do not style any of the rooms we have put our installations into, other than the wheat paste mural itself…

180117052“Chair Baby” (Dec. 2017)

180727111“Chair Baby” (Aug. 2018)

Someone smashed the chair since we last visited “Chair Baby”… Glad they didn’t vandalize the image! But, I sure loved that old chair sitting there.

180207009“Baby Watcher” (Dec. 2017)

This room intrigued me from the beginning with its slatted walls, ceiling and blank slate wall framed at one end, not to mention “Chair Baby” down the hall.

Watch a time-lapse video of Trish and I installing “Baby Watcher”. (click here)

180727038“Baby Watcher” (Aug. 2018)

180727104“Baby Watcher” (Aug. 2018)

I’m amazed at how well this installation has weathered since there is no roof to speak of on this structure.

180127026“Twins” (Dec. 2017)

An experiment on what to do with a nice corner?

180727123“Twins” (Aug. 2018)

We added more paper over the top of the door frame to the right to give this piece a more finished look. “Twins” sits in a space that offers more protection against the elements than most, making for a longer lasting wheat paste installation.

So, if you think we’re just camping out lolly gagging, you would be wrong… We’re busy coming up with the next new thing and creating all kinds of new artistic endeavours. Contact us about your upcoming projects, we’d love to collaborate! e-mail me

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

 

 

 

Wheat Paste Installations over Time

Trish and I have installed several large scale wheat paste murals over the past few years. I’m really impressed with their longevity and the over all quality achieved with an image created with a tiny 35mm black and white negative, printed on 20 lb. bond paper, then wheat pasted to a wall.

180507011“Roper”, our largest mural to date is 9′ high and 22′ across (April 2018). It’s located at the rear of 310 Stewart Street in Carson City, Nevada (not visible from Stewart Street). This image was created with a modified Kodak “Fun Saver Panoramic 35” disposable camera reloaded with Kodak Tri-X black & white film. The panoramic crop is created within the camera, so the negative is really quite small. Yet, I find the quality of this image to be nothing short of amazing, unless, of course you’re standing just a few feet away. At that point you’ll see the grain of the film and the wonderful flaws of a crappy plastic camera.

Watch a time-lapse of us installing “Roper” click here

161216052“Sorting” is another one of my disposable camera images, it’s 5′ x 13′. It is located in the alleyway behind the Western Folklife Center at 510 Railroad Street, Elko, Nevada. The image above was shot just after it was installed in November of 2016.

180728016Same mural in August 2018 almost two years on, it is looking a bit tattered, but it’s deteriorating in such a splendid way, I can’t help but love this wheat paste more as it ages.

With the exception of the top image “Roper”, these are true wheat paste installations, meaning we cook up flour and water with a little sugar at the end, let it cool and then roll it on the surfaces as well as over the top of the print as the only glue. For “Roper”, we used industrial grade wall paper adhesive, as Carson City was looking for a longer lasting “temporary art” installation. The Carson City mural site faces west and is blasted every afternoon by the hot Nevada sun. The Elko murals are in an alleyway protecting them from Nevada’s weather extremes.

161216032“Mustang Windmill” same camera, 5′ x 13′, was located in the alleyway behind the Carlin Trend Building in Elko, Nevada. It didn’t fare so well, as it got tagged shortly after it went up, but then, water from snow melt ran off the side of the building down the wall, mostly destroying the image all together. We removed it’s carcass after three short months.

160412_7427“Roping”, 5′ x 7′ by Trish Reynolds was created using a 1920’s Kodak Brownie camera loaded with Ilford FP-4 120 film. This was the first large scale public art installation Trish and I collaborated on (Nov. 2016).

180728010“Roping”, almost two years later, has taken on an entirely new look (August 2018).

170416079The alleyway behind the Western Folklife Center in Elko, Nevada (March 2017)

161216026“Antelope Shute” 7′ x 7′ and “Horses at Potts” 7′ x 17′ Elko, Nevada (Feb. 2017).

170221016“Horses at Potts” at 4th & Idaho in downtown Elko, Nevada. This site too, didn’t fare well, as the abandoned building doesn’t have gutters and the water (snow melt) from the roof pours off the side down the walls, making quick work of destroying the murals. Only a small amount of “Horses at Potts” is visible between political signs as of August 2018.

We love putting these murals up. It’s equally fun to install them, as it is to watch them gracefully disintegrate. Looking forward to the next installation!

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

 

 

 

Time to Move

Time

With the EPA deregulating many rules inclusive of the mining industry, the small community of Eureka, Nevada, an area rich with new geological discoveries, has been experiencing an uptick in activity. Drillers rolling in, new mining companies opening offices, 5th Wheel trailers filling empty lots, rentals full and real estate seeing an increase in activity.

BuelStreet

In the middle of winter we were seeing activity on our 1880 Bank Building! One weekend alone, our real estate agent had multiple groups coming through to view our property, this after five years of thinking we were never going to sell the place! How exciting when the first offer came in! Unfortunately, it turned out to be an insultingly “low ball” offer that we ended up turning down… Then, the very next week a new door opened, our agent called to say a gentleman was on his way to see the building and would we be there to show it? He drove two days to get to Eureka from the Pacific Northwest. We showed the place to him most of the day, crawling through every passage possible and climbing ladders across the roof checking out every detail. He saw the good, the bad and the ugly. At the end of the day, we had a hand shake deal and all parties were quite happy. He needed to drive back to the Northwest and sell his property, so we agreed to close in 90 days. The first morning he returned to the Northwest he was awaked by a knock on the door, a woman standing there asking, “would you be interested in selling your house?”. It’s amazing how things fall together when they are meant to be…

Sunroom01

At first we thought, 90 days is plenty of time to pack up and move out… Wrong! When you live in a community as small and remote as Eureka, Nevada, things just take a lot longer. We’re so lucky we had started to purge our stuff nearly a year earlier. Best guess is we have sold, given away, donated, recycled or discarded nearly half of our belongings. For the first two months, we concentrated on packing and boxing up everything for long term storage. We would have clothes purging sessions. We both had lost considerable weight and most of our clothes no longer fit. So, most of our clothes were donated or repurposed. We held moving sales to find new homes for our unwanted stuff.

Next, where do we put everything? With a little research Trish found a storage unit and mailing address (forwarding service) in Carson City, Nevada.

Storage

Did I ever mention that Eureka, Nevada is a remote community? Depending on which direction you go, it’s a four to six hour drive to get to a city of reasonable size (a real grocery store). At first we thought we’d not put the miles on the Sprinter and rent a truck. Well at .89 cents a mile plus daily fees and insurance we quickly came to the realization that turning our Sprinter into a cargo hauler would save a lot of money. Not to mention, it was easier on our aging bodies to break up the packing and moving.

SeatOut

Our 2012 Mercedes Benz Sprinter has a Van Specialties interior. We knew the camper interior came out without the use of tools, but had never removed it before. It took about an hour, included taking out all of the camping gear too.

InsideRear

InsideFront

Cargo Hauler! The maximum allowable cargo capacity of our Sprinter is 5,880 lbs. On at least one trip to our storage unit we had an estimated load of around 5,000 lbs. The Sprinter handled it amazingly! Drove like a Mercedes Benz and got 20mpg doing it!

Studio01

It took several trips to storage to empty the building. We have come to the conclusion we still have way too much stuff. We plan on figuring out how to get through the storage unit and reduce even more…

Rusty

Rusty was somewhat stressed-out through the packing and moving parts. We kept his food, water, beds and litter box in their same places to help reduce his stress, but he was still stressed. Once we moved into the Sprinter he completely relaxed and is ready for adventure!

LivingRoom

The last week living in Eureka we were camping in our building.

Gone

“Gone” Our last day in Eureka, Nevada was Monday, April 30th 2018…

Parking

By the time we had reverted the Sprinter back into a camper and packed it for extended adventure, Spring had arrived and we are now mobile…

 

“Harnessing the Wind” Construction

The construction portfolio of “Harnessing the Wind” consists of 21 – 6 1/2” x 10” color digital photographs, printed on 8 1/2” x 11” Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Bright White 301 gsm smooth paper on an Epson 7890 printer using Epson’s Ultrachrome K3 inkset. I made five behind the scenes visits to document the construction of two utility grade commercial wind energy projects in the United States. The photographs were created between 2012 and 2014, printed by myself in Eureka, Nevada in November of 2015.

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A large hole is excavated for the base of the wind turbine. Since this wind farm was built on Bureau of Land Management land, BLM archeologist contractors oversee the excavation watching for archeological artifacts. The painted diagram on the first layer of concrete is a template for the rebar. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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Rebar is put into place. A crane moves the rebar for the workers to assemble. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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Once the rebar is put into place, workers build the concrete forms. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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Workers pour concrete over the rebar contained by the forms. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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Ground wires are placed over the finished concrete base. It is now ready for backfilling with earth. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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Once the backfilling is complete, cranes built on site erect the tower. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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A painter prepares the surface on a tower section prior to assembly. Pattern Energy’s Panhandle 2 Wind, Texas.

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Tower sections are assembled by site built cranes. Pattern Energy’s Panhandle 2 Wind, Texas.

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A nacelle is lifted off the truck trailer and prepped for lift. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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A worker atop the tower awaits the arrival of the nacelle. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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Two workers place a lift strap around a blade in preparation for assembly to the hub. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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The blade is lifted by crane for assembly to the hub. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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Workers maneuver the blade for proper alignment to the hub. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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Workers hook up the blade assembly to the crane. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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A site built crane begins to lift the blade and hub assembly to the nacelle. Pattern Energy’s Panhandle 2 Wind, Texas.

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Hub and blade assembly lift. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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The crane positions the blade and hub assembly for attachment to the nacelle. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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A worker attaches the blade and hub assembly. Pattern Energy’s Panhandle 2 Wind, Texas.

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An electrical substation is built on site to connect to the power grid. Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind, Nevada.

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Power transmission lines carry power from the wind farm to the electrical grid. Pattern Energy’s Ocotillo Wind, California.

Here is a link to the “Harnessing the Wind” portfolio.

Special thanks to NV Energy, Pattern Energy and Mortenson Construction for their generous contributions that helped to make this portfolio possible!

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

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“Harnessing the Wind”

I am beyond thrilled to be a part of the Archive Collections of the Center for Art + Environment at the Nevada Museum of Art!

01_080812432Spring Valley, Nevada

My portfolio “Harnessing the Wind” consists of 21 – 14” x 21” color digital photographs, printed on 17” x 22” Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Bright White 301 gsm smooth paper on an Epson 7890 printer using Epson’s Ultrachrome K3 inkset. I made 15 in depth visits to three utility grade commercial wind energy projects in the United States. The photographs were created between 2012 and 2014, printed by myself in Eureka, Nevada in November of 2015.

02_080812436Spring Valley, Nevada

I was contacted by a San Francisco advertising agency in 2011 to document construction of Nevada’s first utility grade wind farm, and was excited to work on an assignment incorporating a gorgeous landscape with an industrial scale renewable energy project.

03_080812591Spring Valley, Nevada

Pattern Energy’s Spring Valley Wind is situated on 7,680 acres of BLM administered land, thirty miles east of Ely, Nevada in White Pine County near US-50. Spring Valley Wind consists of 66 2.3 megawatt Siemens wind turbine generators. The 152 megawatt facility started selling electricity to NV Energy in August of 2012.

12/17/2012 Spring Valley Wind ParkSpring Valley, Nevada

After negotiations, planning meetings and scheduling, I finally had the opportunity to explore the Spring Valley construction site in October of 2011. I located the lay down yard covered with pick up trucks, heavy equipment and temporary office trailers and checked in with the staff of Mortenson Construction. Site specific safety training and personal safety equipment are a prerequisite prior to entering the construction site. We were escorted by a safety officer for a tour of the site while working out the best way to accomplish an extensive shot list.

121912 Spring Valley Wind ParkSpring Valley, Nevada

We scouted locations the day before for early light and arrived the next day about an hour before sunrise. Provided we followed strict safety rules, stay out of active construction zones and wore our safety gear, we were free to roam the site making photographs of the largely unfinished wind farm. Shortly after sunrise, crews began arriving for their daily safety briefing. We met our safety officer, who escorted us to the individual construction sites. He introduced us to each site’s foreman, who in turn would go over site specific safety concerns and then had us sign in.

121912 Spring Valley Wind ParkSpring Valley, Nevada

My wife, Trish, who is also my producer and assistant, would set me up with equipment for the particular scene. Sometimes, she would need to stay back while I went into the active construction site with the safety officer watching my back enabling me to get close to the action without getting hurt or impeding construction. At sites that were less hectic or dangerous, she’d assist by holding a radio controlled strobe or fill card to help with lighting.

121912 Spring Valley Wind ParkSpring Valley, Nevada

Because Spring Valley is located on BLM public lands, excavation was done with archeologists observing for artifacts. The BLM also required the areas around the turbines to be restored to its natural state upon completion to have as little impact as possible on the fragile desert ecosystem. At this early point in construction, other than the grid of access roads, most of the landscape was undisturbed. I documented workers using heavy equipment excavating, setting rebar and then pouring concrete foundations. After those tasks, more earthwork was done to back fill the foundations.

08_130619090Ocotillo, California

We returned to Spring Valley in April of 2012 to photograph a much more evolved construction site. Although far from it, the site looked largely complete. This time, we photographed tower erections and 174’ blades being connected to the hub. The lift involves picking up a complete rotor assembly, lifting it to the top of the 262’ tower with a giant site-built crane while workers inside connect the two pieces.

09_130619134Ocotillo, California

Returning in August 2012 we photographed the grand opening for Pattern Energy which was preempted by stormy weather. It was spectacular weather for me though, so I was busy until it was too dark to shoot creating many of the images found in this portfolio.

10_130619229Ocotillo, California

Our last photo shoot at Spring Valley Wind was to document the entire wind farm in the winter. The snow finally flew in December and we spent a couple of beautiful, but very cold, (-18˚C / 0˚F) days photographing.

11_130620309Ocotillo, California

The success at Spring Valley Wind led to an invitation to photograph Pattern Energy’s Ocotillo Wind facility located on 12,500 acres of BLM land, northwest of Ocotillo, California in Imperial County. This site consists of 112 – 2.3 megawatt Siemens turbines. The 265 megawatt facility started selling electricity in July of 2013.

12_130621036Ocotillo, California

On our first trip to Ocotillo, we arrived at the mostly completed wind farm in mid June. Ocotillo is just 12 miles from the US Mexico border and it was very hot. For our three-day photo shoot the lowest temperate was 28˚C (83˚F) and the high was 46˚C (114˚F).

13_130621200Ocotillo, California

This photo shoot was very different from Spring Valley. My shot list was primarily to create beautiful landscape images of the facility and to make it look like it was functioning when it was not.

14_131121088Ocotillo, California

I was also charged with documenting this facility’s unique feature, the “Bird Tower”, an observation tower staffed by an ornithologist to watch for avian activity. The ornithologist has the ability to shut down the entire facility to reduce bird mortality. The facility was also stocked with equipment to respond to any wild animal event. I spent three days photographing Ocotillo Wind. We returned one last time to document the grand opening event and to photograph the fully functioning power generating facility.

15_140617185Panhandle, Texas

The next invitation from Pattern was to the Panhandle of Texas for a three day photo shoot in June of 2014.

16_140617301Panhandle, Texas

Panhandle Wind is divided into two wind farms with both facilities located north of Panhandle, Texas in Carson County. Pan 1 is located on 52 privately held parcels of land with long-term lease agreements consisting of 118 – 1.85 megawatt General Electric turbines generating 218 megawatts. It began commercial operation in July of 2014. Pan 2 is located immediately west of Pan 1 on 40 privately held parcels of land with long-term lease agreements consisting of 79 – 2.3 megawatt Siemens turbines generating 182 megawatts. It started commercial operation in November of 2014.

17_140617414Panhandle, Texas

The Panhandle of Texas is so flat you can make out the curvature of the earth. I thought the location was going to be a challenge since all the other wind farms I’d previously documented were surrounded by dramatic geologic formations. Turns out, the flat landscape didn’t make the location any less interesting to photograph.

18_141114206Panhandle, Texas

Pan 1 was finished and producing power and Pan 2 was well into its construction phase. I was charged with a long shot list of specific construction images to be completed plus a few landscape shots of Pan 1 since it was finished, and any images I could get of Pan 2 that made it look like it was up and running.

19_141114239Panhandle, Texas

We returned to Panhandle, Texas in November of 2014 for a one-day photo shoot to document the grand opening event and create beauty images of the now fully functioning Pan 2. For several weeks prior to the grand opening the weather had been dull, gray and raining and it wasn’t looking promising for photographing anything outside.

20_141114297Panhandle, Texas

We had luck on our side though. Other than it was 10 degrees and windy, we had blue sky and sun. The turbines looked fantastic and were operating at peak capacity. I came prepared for any weather and donned my arctic parka and took to the wind farm once again to document it from before sun up to after sun down.

21_141114709Panhandle, Texas

Here is a link to the “Construction” portfolio.

Special thanks to NV Energy, Pattern Energy and Mortenson Construction for their generous contributions that helped to make this portfolio possible!

All images © 2018 Deon Reynolds

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Nevada Museum of Art’s Barrio Block Party

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Trish and I will have a booth set up selling our fine art photography at the

Nevada Museum of Art’s Barrio Block Party. Hope to see you there!

Saturday June 13th from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Nevada Museum of Art

160 W Liberty St, Reno, NV 89501

(775) 329-3333

Join us for a blowout summer kick-off block party! Enjoy a free day at the Museum, live performances, food and craft vendors and hands-on art projects. Watch as we create original woodblock prints using an industrial asphalt roller. Make colorful tissue paper flowers and papel picado and enjoy the sounds of live music! Activities run from 10 am – 4 pm. FREE admission to the Museum continues until 6 pm.

Digital Disaster

Earlier this year cleaning up in the studio, I accidentally knocked a 3TB hard drive off my desk and it crashed to the floor ceasing to function. When I plugged it back in, it briefly made a grinding/buzzing noise then nothing… It does not show up on the desktop, nor does it show up in disk utilities, making disk recovery impossible. This hard drive contained every single image ever shot with both Canon 5D MkII digital cameras spanning a five year period. Fortunately, I also back up to DVD and jobs get backed up twice, once as delivered, usually full sized tiff’s and as unedited dng files. The problem here is that when I started to back up from the DVD’s to a new hard drive most of the DVD’s wouldn’t play. I installed a second optical drive into my MacPro. Now most of the DVD’s do play, but not all of them (insert expletive here)! Also, I had not backed up to DVD for several months. So, every image created between August and January is gone forever (except jobs), along with those random DVD’s that still will not play (insert very loud expletive here)! I ordered several new internal and external hard drives for the MacPro and one more portable hard drive for the MacBook Pro so, this way I can create multiple back ups while on the road as well and even more back ups once I return to the studio.

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Storm chasing near Eureka, Nevada May 17th, 2015.

All this digital turmoil has made me rethink how I feel about and deal with digital photography. Don’t get me wrong, I like digital as much as I like analog photography. I think of the two as tools, not a preference, not unlike a painter would chose a different paint brush to create a different look. I pick up a different camera to create the effect I’m after. Many of my photographer friends would throw a major wobbler about now, shouting and screaming to defend how much better digital or analog is from the other. I think you’re all very funny! Over the last decade I have been shooting most of my personal color work with digital. All of my black & white has been on film. But lately, for my personal color work I have been returning to film and my Hasselblad. I don’t think it is as much about whether or not it’s digital or analog, but rather how much I really like designing within the square format over a rectangle.

WA-0529

Lower Columbia River, Washington

CA-0444

Tahoe, California

CA-0350

Ibex Dunes, California

NV-1932

Immigrant Road, Nevada

OR-0041

Columbia River Gorge, Oregon

Wild Woman Artists

Are you going to the 31st Annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada? If so, Trish (A Wild Woman Artist) and myself (Guest Artist) will be part of an amazing show and sale at Duncan LittleCreek Gallery right across the parking lot from the Western Folklife Center.

This event is free and open to the public.

Support the arts, buy art for your Valentine!

Hope to see you there!

WW unbridled 2 FLAT

Artist Reception: Thursday January 29th, 2015 – 5 – 8 pm

Show hours: Friday January 30th, 2015 – Noon to 8 pm

Saturday January 31st, 2015 10 am – 6 pm

Kathleen Durham’s Underwood Story Hour Saturday January 31st, 2015 – 11 am

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Duncan LittleCreek Gallery & Bar

518 Commercial Street

Elko, Nevada 89801

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Artists:

Susan Church – Metal sculpture

Kathleen Durham – Stories in cloth and clay

Kristen Frantzen-Orr – Art Glass beads and jewelry

Barbara Prodaniuk – Clay

Gail Rappa – Jewelry

Trish Reynolds – Photography

Sidne Teske – Paintings

Guest Artists:

Marti Bein – Paintings

Teresa Jordan – Artist and Author

Deon Reynolds – Photography